© Liverpool Geological Society

ABOUT

Liverpool Geological

Society

On 13th December 1859 nine men met at 7 London Road, Liverpool, the home of George Highfield Moreton, a painter and decorator, and agreed to the formation of The Liverpool Geological Society. The objects of the Society were formulated "to investigate the structure of the Earth, the character of its past inhabitants, and the changes now in progress upon its surface" ... A Past President and Member, Professor Herdman and his wife endowed a Chair of Geology in The University of Liverpool in 1916 in memory of their son Lieutenant George Herdman who was killed in the First World War. With the opening of a Department of Geology in 1929, again due to Professor Herdman's generosity in memory of his wife, Jane, many meetings were held in that building at the invitation of the first Professor PGH Boswell. Meetings continued to be held in The University of Liverpool's Jane Herdman Laboratories of Geology, until latterly, ever increasing charges for overtime staff led to meetings being moved once again to Liverpool John Moores University's Byrom Street Campus.     
Today, after more than 150 years, the Society still flourishes, and is still composed overwhelmingly of ordinary people who have an interest in geology in all its many aspects - from volcanoes to floods, deserts and seas, mountains and glaciers, minerals and rocks, and fossils. Ever since the Society's first open meeting, on 10th January 1860, The Liverpool Geological Society has invited the knowledgeable and famous to come and tell all those interested in the wonders of the world and its even more amazing history, beginning some 4,600,000,000 years ago.
 Founded 1859
Registered Charity No: 500067
Click to access earliest proceedings.

LIVERPOOL

GEOLOGICAL

SOCIETY

159th Session

ABOUT

Liverpool

Geological Society

On 13th December 1859 nine men met at 7 London Road, Liverpool, the home of George Highfield Moreton, a painter and decorator, and agreed to the formation of The Liverpool Geological Society. The objects of the Society were formulated "to investigate the structure of the Earth, the character of its past inhabitants, and the changes now in progress upon its surface" ... A Past President and Member, Professor Herdman and his wife endowed a Chair of Geology in The University of Liverpool in 1916 in memory of their son Lieutenant George Herdman who was killed in the First World War. With the opening of a Department of Geology in 1929, again due to Professor Herdman's generosity in memory of his wife, Jane, many meetings were held in that building at the invitation of the first Professor PGH Boswell. Meetings continued to be held in The University of Liverpool's Jane Herdman Laboratories of Geology, until latterly, ever increasing charges for overtime staff led to meetings being moved once again to Liverpool John Moores University's Byrom Street Campus.     
© Liverpool Geological Society
Today, after more than 150 years, the Society still flourishes, and is still composed overwhelmingly of ordinary people who have an interest in geology in all its many aspects - from volcanoes to floods, deserts and seas, mountains and glaciers, minerals and rocks, and fossils. Ever since the Society's first open meeting, on 10th January 1860, The Liverpool Geological Society has invited the knowledgeable and famous to come and tell all those interested in the wonders of the world and its even more amazing history, beginning some 4,600,000,000 years ago.
Click to access earliest proceedings.

Liverpool Geological

Society

159 th session
Registered Charity No: 500067