© Liverpool Geological Society
 Founded 1859
Registered Charity No: 500067

LIVERPOOL

GEOLOGICAL

SOCIETY

159th Session
All indoor meetings at 7.30pm in Lecture Theatre 137 of Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street L3 3AF unless otherwise stated. Campus map of LJMU - please click to get one you can read! The meeting is in the City Campus (1) The building map is here: Go in the main entrance - up to the first floor -  and all the way along the corridors towards the James Parsons Tower . At the end of the corridor is the Lecture Theatre.
Hon. Excursions Sec.: Maggie Williams email: williams.maggiee@gmail.com

Refreshments will be served

at the front of the lecture

theatre prior to the lecture.

Speakers’ Sec.: C. Hunt email: chris1972scfc@outlook.com

January 23

Dr Tim Lane

Liverpool John Moores University

Greenlandic glacier behaviour during the last 2,000 years The climate of the past 2,000 years provides critical context for current anthropogenic climate forcing, and provide a great baseline for better understanding the impact of natural climate variability on Earth surface processes. Glaciers in the Arctic are currently experiencing rapid retreat, thinning, and mass loss, contributing to global sea level. Given the Arctic is projected to warm at twice the rate of the global average, melt of these glaciers are likely to increase. Studying the past extent of glaciers and the timing of their advance and retreat can provide a detailed insight into how these Arctic ice masses respond to climate change. Throughout the past 2,000 years, most mountain glaciers experienced their largest extent during the Little Ice Age (1450 to 1850 CE, LIA), a period marked by colder hemispheric temperatures. However, despite known climate fluctuations such as this, the record of glacier behaviour is more complex.

February 6

Dr Pat Byrne

Liverpool John Moores University

Water quality impacts and river system recovery following the 2014 Mount Polley mine tailings dam spill, British Columbia, Canada The Mount Polley mine tailings embankment breach on August 4th 2014, in British Columbia, Canada, is the second largest mine waste spill on record. The mine operator responded swiftly by removing significant quantities of tailings from the primary receiving watercourse, stabilizing the river corridor and beginning construction of a new river channel. This presented a unique opportunity to study spatial patterns of element cycling in a partially-restored and alkaline river system. Overall, water quality impacts are considered low with Cu being the only element of concern. However, the spatial pattern of stream Cu loading suggested chemical (dominant at low flow) and physical (dominant at high flow) mobilization processes operating in different parts of the watershed. Chemical mobilization was hypothesized to be due to Cu sulfide (chalcopyrite) oxidation in riparian tailings and reductive dissolution of Cu- bearing Fe oxides in tailings and streambed sediments whereas physical mobilization was due to erosion and suspension of Cu-rich stream sediments further downstream. Although elevated aqueous Cu was evident in Hazeltine Creek, this is considered a relatively minor perturbation to a watershed with naturally elevated stream Cu concentrations. The alkaline nature of the tailings and the receiving watercourse ensures most aqueous Cu is rapidly complexed with dissolved organic matter or precipitates as secondary mineral phases. Our data highlights how swift removal of spilled tailings and river corridor stabilization can limit chemical impacts in affected watersheds but also how chemical mobilization (of Cu) can still occur when the spilled tailings and the receiving environment are alkaline. We present a conceptual model of Cu cycling in the Hazeltine Creek watershed.

February 17

Herdman Symposium

February 20

This is a joint meeting with the North West Group of the Geological Society of London

Prof Richard Chiverrell

University of Liverpool

Lake Sediments

March 6

Distinguished Visitor’s Address

Prof Derek Siveter

Oxford University

'Exceptional Cambrian  fossils, the flowering of early animal life, and world heritage in Yunnan'

March 13

Dinner

March 20

Dr Steve Crowley

University of Liverpool

 Hematite mineralization of the East Irish Sea Basin
© Liverpool Geological Society

Liverpool Geological

Society

159 th session
Registered Charity No: 500067

January 23

Dr Tim Lane

Liverpool John Moores University

Greenlandic ice cap behaviour during the last millennium The climate of the past 2,000 years provides critical context for current anthropogenic climate forcing, and provide a great baseline for better understanding the impact of natural climate variability on Earth surface processes. Glaciers in the Arctic are currently experiencing rapid retreat, thinning, and mass loss, contributing to global sea level. Given the Arctic is projected to warm at twice the rate of the global average, melt of these glaciers are likely to increase. Studying the past extent of glaciers and the timing of their advance and retreat can provide a detailed insight into how these Arctic ice masses respond to climate change. Throughout the past 2,000 years, most mountain glaciers experienced their largest extent during the Little Ice Age (1450 to 1850 CE, LIA), a period marked by colder hemispheric temperatures. However, despite known climate fluctuations such as this, the record of glacier behaviour is more complex.

February 6

Dr Pat Byrne

Liverpool John Moores University

River Pollution The Mount Polley mine tailings embankment breach on August 4th 2014, in British Columbia, Canada, is the second largest mine waste spill on record. The mine operator responded swiftly by removing significant quantities of tailings from the primary receiving watercourse, stabilizing the river corridor and beginning construction of a new river channel. This presented a unique opportunity to study spatial patterns of element cycling in a partially-restored and alkaline river system. Overall, water quality impacts are considered low with Cu being the only element of concern. However, the spatial pattern of stream Cu loading suggested chemical (dominant at low flow) and physical (dominant at high flow) mobilization processes operating in different parts of the watershed. Chemical mobilization was hypothesized to be due to Cu sulfide (chalcopyrite) oxidation in riparian tailings and reductive dissolution of Cu-bearing Fe oxides in tailings and streambed sediments whereas physical mobilization was due to erosion and suspension of Cu-rich stream sediments further downstream. Although elevated aqueous Cu was evident in Hazeltine Creek, this is considered a relatively minor perturbation to a watershed with naturally elevated stream Cu concentrations. The alkaline nature of the tailings and the receiving watercourse ensures most aqueous Cu is rapidly complexed with dissolved organic matter or precipitates as secondary mineral phases. Our data highlights how swift removal of spilled tailings and river corridor stabilization can limit chemical impacts in affected watersheds but also how chemical mobilization (of Cu) can still occur when the spilled tailings and the receiving environment are alkaline. We present a conceptual model of Cu cycling in the Hazeltine Creek watershed.

February 17

Herdman Symposium

February 20

This is a joint meeting with the North West Group of the Geological Society of London

Prof Richard Chiverrell

University of Liverpool

Lake Sediments

March 6

Distinguished Visitor’s Address

Prof Derek Siveter

Oxford University

'Exceptional Cambrian  fossils, the flowering of early animal life, and world heritage in Yunnan'

March 13

Dinner

March 20

Dr Steve Crowley

University of Liverpool

 Hematite mineralization of the East Irish Sea Basin